Posted by: Admin | October 12, 2010

Eat, Pray, Love

First, an apology. I have had all of my adult children coming and going at various points over the past few days and so I simply haven’t had the energy to post at 12.01 as I do normally. That means that there have been some, particularly in the US, who bring up the blog at their usual time and find it missing the daily post. Apologies for that: normal service will be resumed shortly. Thanks for bearing with it!

Right. Yesterday I snuck off for an illicit afternoon at the cinema (I don’t know why it felt illicit – maybe because it was the first day when I would normally be working and everyone else was at their desks?) with my daughters. We picked  “Eat, Pray, Love” from the book by Elizabeth GilbertEat, Pray, Love: One Woman’s Search for Everything” since it seemed to fit into the project50 vibe (and yes, in case the thought crossed your mind, even my family have to live by the blog at the moment!)

 

Julia Roberts in Eat, Pray, Love

It’s a straightforward tale of one woman’s quest to “find herself”. Critics have apparently said that the film doesn’t pick up on the author’s depression which, I understand (since I haven’t read it) is more explicit in the book, however, I disagree: we are shown rather than told that this is mental place from which she begins. This film is not the place for dumbing down.

Daughter no.2 pointed out the unusual shooting style that sees the camera flit from shot to shot in places, mimicking the way the mind jumps from subject to subject. She’s right, but then she’s cleverer than me when it comes to film and I didn’t notice it at the time. I was simply indulging in a nostalgic journey around Rome and promising myself that yes, I will go back to Italy soon!

The cinematography was truly beautiful, as was Julia Roberts as Liz. In Italy she embraced the pleasure of food and to godersi la vita (enjoy life)  In India she learned how to find that place of stillness within that grounds us all through life’s turbulent times, the place that we in the West so often find difficult to access. And in Bali she found purpose, and, ultimately, allowed herself to love again.

A couple of hours in a darkened auditorium with this film is time well spent – it will leave you with food for thought but, most importantly, a nice warm feeling in your heart 😉

Enjoy!

 

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Responses

  1. Depression with a happy ending? Sounds a bit Hollywood to me.

  2. Point taken, Ian, but depression can lift, even outside Hollywood!

  3. I was going to get youy to come with me, still you’ve sold it to me, Im sure I can find someone else xxx

  4. I’m planning to see “Made in Dagenham” next if you’re up for it?


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